Volume 2, Issue 8: April 30, 2000

eLetter > Volume 2, Issue 8: April 30, 2000

Contents (click for article)

Next Issues

  • More Wellness Info
  • Feature Articles
  • Reviews
  • Reader Profiles, Q&A, Comments
  • Healthcare News

Wellness Components – Professional Healthcare:  Naturopathy, by Kenton H Johnson, Executive Director, CompWellness Network and the American Naturopathic Medical Association

Wellness – Professional Healthcare

Naturopathy (Natur-op’-athy), sometimes known as Naturopathic Medicine, has its own proven, well-founded theories which explain the problems of disease. Its philosophy of health is wholly in conformity with Nature’s Laws of Life as expressed in the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Naturopathy administers no therapy that sets up an unnatural reaction in the human body. It differs from all other healing professions for it does not depend upon a single method of treatment to reach all diseases, but combines, in one well-ordered system of therapeutics, the best of all forms of natural healing. It also treats each case by the combination of methods best suited for the client.

Naturopathic Doctors – NDs – have some of the same basic education and rigor as MDs, but instead of drugs and surgery they learn and regularly use a wider range of non-invasive modalities. See full article for a partial list.

Copyright (c) ANMA - CLICK for WEBSITE

NDs are represented by a 3,000-member Holistic Healing Academy, the American Naturopathic Medical Association (ANMA), and a 400-member, exclusivity-minded organization, the American Association of Naturopathic Physicians (AANP). The ANMA also represents other practitioners who follow the ANMA Code of Ethics. In part, it states:

  • First do no harm
  • Practice the healing power of nature
  • Identify and treat the cause
  • Treat the whole person; the multi-factorial nature of health and disease
  • Practice prevention – the best “cure”

See full article for the complete list.

Licensing and Registration

Naturopathic Physicians – those with four-year, medical-type training and clinical experience – are licensed to practice in only eleven states – probably because Naturopathic remedies and practices do not create the problems requiring tight scrutiny by local government. However, Washington DC provides a registration to practice Naturopathy within the District of Columbia. Although the DC cannot – and does not – provide a registration for the other states and US territories, the practice has been that DC registrants practicing in those states and US territories without a licensing board are using the DC registration as one means of establishing credibility and due diligence.

The DC registration law is posted at DC’s service organization under DC Naturopathy Regulations. Registration is managed by the Washington DC Dept of Health Regulation Administration, Healthcare Licensing and Customer Service Division, Naturopathy Board, (202)442-4770, Bonnie Rampersaud, Professional Licensing Director. The American Naturopathic Medical Certification and Accreditation Board (ANMCAB) certifies most of the Naturopaths in the US and nearly all of the registrants in Washington DC.

Make sure that the Naturopathic Practitioner you use has a state license, is registered in Washington DC, or is board certified by ANMCAB.

You’ll find some political rhetoric on both the ANMA and the AANP websites. We favor ignoring the fighting and looking at the information and benefits of using a personable, well-trained ND who will evaluate, diagnose and recommend remedies and therapies that follow Naturopathy’s principles and ethics.

See the eGuide Naturopathic Medicine chapter and other chapters for the separate modalities, as well as American Naturopathic Medical Association (ANMA) website. The ANMA can be reached in Nevada at (702)897-7053 or by Email.

Find Naturopathic Medicine practitioners at CompWellness Members (search for Naturopathic), and through the steps suggested at How to Find a Practitioner or Business.

Click title for full article.

Wellness Components – Professional Healthcare:  Healing with Art, by Arlene M Green, LCSW, ACSW

Arlene M Green, LCSW, ACSW

In March, we received a group of questions from a woman in the UK regarding art therapy. We forwarded the questions to some of our members who use art in their practices. This article was developed out of Ms Green’s kind and informative response.

I am not an art therapist, rather, I’m an artist who is a psychotherapist. I use art, among other creative methods, in my treatment work.

Why use art or any other form of creative expression – movement, music, writing, etc – to assist with healing? Because therapists use treatment modalities with which they are most comfortable, and clients are more likely to heal, grow and change when they are exposed to the modalities that best meet their needs.

Everyone is Creative

This therapeutic process is not about artmaking. Artmaking incorporates creativity and is related to the arts. Creativity is its own entity whether artistically oriented or not. This is an intuitive, unconscious process that invites discovery. Results can reveal beauty, gentleness, intensity and any emotion.

Art that is produced in a therapeutic setting is not about making art. It is about the expression of feeling with art as the medium. It’s a means of self-expression that is oriented towards process not result. It’s not to be judged as good or bad art or the style as right or wrong. Essentially whatever is created is the perfect expression of the client’s feelings in that moment.

For All Ages

Therapeutic art is commonly used with children since it’s such a normal form of speech for a child. They often lack words, but they certainly can draw pictures which have meaning for them.

Adults have the same capability. Once adults move into the playfulness of expressing themselves through art, they can reveal a great deal.

Sometimes this work is directed – such as draw a tree. More often, it isn’t. The color, size and medium a person chooses as well as whether a piece is representational or not are all useful information. The degree of vigor, sounds and body language that go into creating can also provide insight into a client’s issues.

Click title for full article.

Column – Sam Benjamin, MD (Send comments for Dr Benjamin to us)

Healing Revolution

Dr Benjamin has been traveling and lecturing for several days, so we are going to give you some background, by way of an article, “The Healing Revolution,” Life magazine, September 1996, by George Howe Colt, pp 10-13.

Free reprint permission has not been granted by Time-Life. This article may be available in your library. It is also still online. Dr Benjamin’s section begins on Page 10, and finishes on Page 13.

Dr Sam Benjamin is a pioneering holistic MD in New York and Arizona, working side-by-side with other pioneers such as Andrew Weil, MD. He spent a number of years working in international health then later in private practice. Most recently, he was recruited to the State University of New York at Stony Brook School of Medicine where he runs the new Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

Questions & Answers (Email your questions to us at Info@CompWellness.org)

Healthcare in the year 2000 and beyond will be as much prevention and preparation as it will be responding intelligently to symptoms. Building strong body systems involves learning some new ways to deal with old problems. Here are some straight-forward answers to typical and complicated medical problems.

Note: Additional help is offered to those who subscribe to the 21st Century Wellness eLetter.

Holistic Vet for a Dying Husky – Claire G – April 20th

I am trying to help a friend who just learned yesterday, that her dog (a Husky) has only got 3-6 months to live as she has cancer. She had her spleen removed last week, there were tumors on it and the result of the biopsy showed malignant cells. I would like to know if there is anyone who would provide alternative treatment for this dog. My friend lives in Quincy, but would be willing to travel to help “Heidi.” Can you give me any information or leads on alternative medicine for animals? Thank you.

Since I’m not sure where Quincy is or close to, I’m going to let you determine that.

See How to Find a Practitioner or Business.

Also, try a SavvySearch for Animal Cancer Treatments.

Joining CompWellness Network – Yvonne S – April 25th

Do you have a written procedure for listing wellness practitioners outside of the Denver area? I am a certified lifestyle coach trained in Natural Hygiene and would like to be listed with your organization. [Also see Reader Profiles.]

The best way to see what we do in a quick glance is to go to our Membership Section.

Wellness Committee – Alice O – April 28th

I am [the] Human Resources Manager for [a large law firm] located in Chicago, Illinois. I am in the process of gathering information regarding a wellness committee and would appreciate any insights your organization could offer. Thank you in advance for your attention and cooperation to this matter.

Clearly, CompWellness.org has a wealth of information, as well as other sites in our Resources List.

There is a tremendous opportunity for true wellness in this century, facilitated by organizations, as introduced in our eGuide:

  • Rather than competing, true cooperation between the conventional medical and the Complementary Healthcare communities – MDs, nurses, physical therapists, clinics, hospitals and journals – working together with Acupuncturists through Yogis, including several types of Doctors.
  • More Wellness Programs implemented in small, medium and large organizations – corporations, family businesses, unions, associations, school districts and governments – which combine conventional and complementary modalities for prevention and cure
  • Reduced healthcare costs – the US Office of Alternative Medicine (now the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine) estimated that using complementary medicine would reduce healthcare costs by 44%!
  • More insurance coverage for complementary modalities.
  • Creative insurance plans covering conventional medicine at much lower rates – initially with higher deductibles and co-payments – leaving about 50% of normal insurance outlay available for using complementary healing modalities.

From our eJournal: Wellness is a state of high-level health that requires a strong effort to reach and a continual effort to maintain. The result, however, is the best possibility of good health – now and throughout life. Wellness has four parts:

  • Fitness – your body needs 20-30 minutes of exercise about 5 days per week. About 60% of US adults do not exercise enough and 25% not at all; for US youth, the numbers are 50% and 15%. See ourFitness articles.
  • Nutrition – what and how much you consume effects how you feel, how long you’ll live, and how you deal with illness and disease. It includes healthy foods, supplements and the all-important water. See our Nutrition articles.
  • Attitude – regular non-physical exercise of the mind and spirit effects your mental and emotional state. This integrates your Fitness and Nutrition efforts. See our Attitude articles.
  • Help – regular visits to healthcare professionals who assist you to a healthy state as well as customize your wellness plan. See our Professional Healthcare article.

There are many more articles about Wellness Components in the eJournal – see the article list for this year, that are summarized in our 21st Century Wellness eLetters – see the issue list.

Complementary Wellness is applying this four-part program using the full spectrum of healthcare modalities – Acupressure through Yoga, including conventional Western Medicine. The goal is for you and your healthcare practitioners to work together on your wellness plan, using the least-aggressive therapies available to treat injuries and illness, and to assist you with recovery and prevention.

The move to US complementary wellness will be led by Chiropractic Physicians – the most widely-trained and best organized doctors in the US. They have the same education as an MD, but instead of drugs and surgery, they learned, obviously, Manipulation, Nutrition, Supplementation and other modalities, such as Acupuncture. From our eGuide Chiropractic chapter:

Chiropractic education includes several hundred hours of study in basic sciences including: anatomy, physiology, pathology and neurology. Additional studies include x-ray analysis, physical examination and diagnosis. Chiropractic students are educated in treatment using natural methods such as manipulation, physical therapy, exercise and nutrition.

Doctors of Chiropractic receive as much training as Medical Doctors and pass similar National Board examinations. Chiropractors are especially trained in the biomechanics and the anatomy of the human body, and are experts in treating disorders of the spine and nervous system. Their training requires a minimum of two years undergraduate work with a minimum four years of education from an accredited Chiropractic college, six months of nutritional training and satisfactory completion of a one and one-half year Chiropractic internship. They are also required to pass three National Board examinations and a rigorous state examination.

From the American Chiropractic Association: “Chiropractors are expert providers of spinal and other therapeutic manipulation/adjustments. They also utilize a variety of manual, mechanical and electrical therapeutic modalities. Chiropractors also provide patient evaluation and instructions regarding disease prevention and health promotion through proper nutrition, exercise and lifestyle modification among others.”

Naturopathic Practitioners have some of the same basic education and rigor, but learn and regularly use a wider range of modalities, including: Acupuncture, Acupressure, Biochemistry, Biologicals, Body Alignment, Botanical Medicine, Cell Salts, Clinical Nutrition, Colon Hydrotherapy, Counseling and Stress Management, Darkfield Blood Work, Energy Work, Herbology, Homeopathy, Hypnotherapy, Iridology, Manual Manipulations, Meditation, Mineralogy, Natural Childbirth, Nutritional/Lifestyle Counseling, Oriental Medicine, Physical Medicine, Reflexology, Tissue Remedies, and Vitaminology. Unfortunately, they are not as well organized as Chiropractors nor are they as well recognized. They are licensed to practice in eleven states and through registration in the Washington DC, they may practice in all the other states and US territories.

See the eGuide Naturopathy chapter and other chapters for the separate modalities, as well as the American Naturopathic Medical Association (ANMA) website.

Reader Profiles (Send your profile – in this format – to us at Info@CompWellness.org)

We’ve found it very interesting to find out about the healthcare and other professionals reading our 21st Century Wellness eLetter:

Yvonne Schaefer. Vibrant Health & Fitness, Raleigh NC. Natural Hygiene, Wellness and disease prevention, Lifestyle coaching, Family health training, Spiritual counseling. Will challenge your current thinking and lead you to experience the power of being in control of your own health. EmailNewsletter, (919)755-6256.

James M Kennedy, DDS, FAGD. DentoCranial Therapeutics, Denver CO. Craniomandibular Orthopedics, Temporomandibular Joint Disorders (TMJ), Osteopathic Cranial treatment, Applied Kinesiology, Nutrition and Biochemistry, Physical Therapy and other modalities. Brings modern, specialized diagnostic skills to the healthcare team, addressing the special needs of the head, neck, “TMJ” or facial pain patient.Email, (303)773-3695

News (Email news leads to us at Info@CompWellness.org)

News reports summaries on Healthcare and Wellness follow. We have most of the articles on file in case you look for the web references after they are cleared. Additional news articles are at EarthMed Headlines

You Can Teach Your Old Doc New TricksUSA Weekend, April 21-23, 2000, Tedd Mitchell, MD, USA Weekend’s Medical Editor. Interesting facts, as well as thoughts by a conventional doctor. Edited out some of the more narrow conventional thinking still hanging on from the last Century.

Copyright (c) 2000, USA Weekend - CLICK for WEBSITE

Americans make about 630 million visits to providers of non-traditional medicine each year – that’s more than the number of visits to all primary-care physicians!

Most of the people who use alternative therapies are between 35 and 49, middle-class and educated, says David Eisenberg, MD, a Harvard professor who is an expert in alternative medicine. And most of the alternative therapies they used – 62% – were not disclosed to their physicians. The frequent reason: they didn’t feel their doctor would agree with their choice, whether it was Massage, Chiropractic, Hypnosis, Biofeedback or Acupuncture.

Face it: we’ve all tried alternative therapies, whether it’s as simple as chicken soup for a cold or as complicated as acupuncture for back pain. … Even physicians are not above attempting it: [patient with chronic liver infection using an herbal extract, milk thistle]. The psychological benefit of “doing something” to help yourself is important. …

If you are using an alternative therapy or thinking about starting, my advice is:

  • Tell your doctor. … A physician may not know much about a specific therapy, but a broad background in medicine provides insight you may not have.
  • Expect increasing understanding: 64% of American medical schools now teach elective courses in alternative therapies, reports a survey in the Journal of the American Medical Association. If your physician isn’t willing to listen to something you deem important to your health, you may have the wrong physician.
  • Do your homework. Many reputable organizations and resources have information on various types of therapies. Use these resources to educate yourself (and perhaps your doctor) about the specific therapy you are contemplating.
  • Be aware that “natural” is not always safe … Tobacco, marijuana, alcohol and cocaine are all derived from “natural” things, so don’t fall into this trap.
  • Pay attention to labels. Supplement makers are not permitted by law to make specific claims of benefit for specific diseases, but labels do tend to use upbeat generic terms, such as “good prostate health” or “anti-aging supplement.”

People who try alternative medicine often are trying to:

  • Use lifestyle to prevent illness
  • Become less reliant on traditional health care

Click on title to see full article, including: recommend books and a commentary on “do alternatives work?”

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